Earliest Tang dynasty landscape mural unearthed

The earliest known landscape mural from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) was unearthed in Northwest China’s Shaanxi province, the Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology said.

The mural was found in a tomb believed to be that of Li Daojian, a great-grandson of the first Emperor of the Tang Dynasty, Li Yuan. The single chamber brick tomb was excavated in Fuping County in 2017, according to the institute.

Archaeologists were able to identify the dates and owner of the tomb from an epigraph from the tomb, despite the tomb showing signs of looting.

Although some of the murals were affected by flooding and theft, what remains still has rich patterns, said Wang Xiaomeng, deputy dean of the institute.

The tomb is located near Xi’an, which was the capital of 13 dynasties.

Wild-angle shots

Yuan Minghui’s award-winning photographs help people get up close and personal with the tiny insects.

Award-winning Chinese photographer presents an intimate look at nature’s wonders. Li Yingxue reports.

The dragonfly lands on a leaf. Yuan Minghui crawls toward the insect, carefully not to startle it.

He stops moving just under the leaf, where the dragonfly remains undisturbed.

Yuan is highly attuned to the dragonfly’s movements-a slight twitch of its wings and he knows what it will do next-so he finds the best angle for his target.

With a click of the shutter, Yuan takes his shot-and it becomes another beautiful image of nature’s wonders.

Yuan is a macro photographer, or someone who specializes in closeup photography, from Wuhan, capital of Hubei province. He focuses on the natural environment, plants and insects.

His work, which appears on postcards, calendars, books and other products across the globe, expresses his passion for the natural world.

“Both animals and plants have emotions, and I want to show their beauty and dignity, no matter how tiny they are,” says the 46-year-old.

For the past five years, Yuan has won numerous awards in international photography competitions, including the Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Nature’s Best Photography and International Garden Photographer of the Year-he is the first Chinese photographer to receive that honor.

Prostate cancer focus shifts from finding it early to preventing its advance

Prostate cancer has moved on. The focus used to be on diagnosing this cancer at an early stage. Now that testing is common and so many early cancers are being found, the focus has shifted to trying to prevent these early cancers from developing into advanced disease.

This is a significant shift because most men in their 60s will have a microscopic form of prostate cancer and there aren’t accurate tools to predict whose cancer will stay indolent and whose will become active.

“We know the majority will not be lethal,” says Professor Graham Giles, a leading Australian prostate cancer researcher. “But we don’t know which will remain pussy cats and which will become tigers and kill us.

“This remains the essential research question: How can we tell the tigers from the pussycats?

Balding by the age of 20 appears to raise the risk of a man developing an aggressive prostate cancer later in life
Balding by the age of 20 appears to raise the risk of a man developing an aggressive prostate cancer later in life Paul Maguire

“Until we have that question answered, many men will undergo unnecessary treatment and we’ll have a lot of older men made miserable by the side effects.”

Professor Giles, Head of Research at the Cancer Epidemiology & Intelligence Division of the Cancer Council in Victoria, is leading a huge project to try to identify what flips the switch causing an indolent cancer to wake up and become active.

This unique project, which began five years ago, involving more than 2200 men from private urology practices in Victoria. It aims to determine if any of the factors that cause the flip are amenable to change.

Lifestyle factors and genetics

The project has begun publishing preliminary results, which hint at risk factors that may influence the conversion. So far, three papers have been published, a fourth is about to appear and many more are set to follow.

“I get asked the same question every day. Men want to know what they can do for their prostate health,” says Prof Nathan ...
“I get asked the same question every day. Men want to know what they can do for their prostate health,” says Prof Nathan Lawrentschuk. supplied

Early results cover the role of alcohol, ejaculatory frequency, balding, height, obesity and medication – but these findings differ by genetic profiles obtained from analysing a large genome-wide scan.

“Given the weak associations with lifestyle factors, we are holding most hope for the genetics and we hope to produce risk prediction models that incorporate genetic profiles next year,” says Giles.

Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, the project is based at Cancer Council of Victoria and includes well-known urologists Professor Damien Bolton and Associate Professor Nathan Lawrentschuk.

So far, there are only four known risk factors for initially developing prostate cancer. These are: growing older, having a family history of the disease, race (African men are at high risk) and having an intact supply of testosterone.

Professor Giles, Head of Research at the Cancer Epidemiology & Intelligence Division of the Cancer Council in Victoria, ...
Professor Giles, Head of Research at the Cancer Epidemiology & Intelligence Division of the Cancer Council in Victoria, is leading a huge project to try to identify what flips the switch causing an indolent cancer to wake up and become active. supplied

The prostate is under the control of androgens (male hormones), which explains why eunuchs never get prostate cancer, says Giles.

To investigate this control, the team looked for signs of androgen activity, such as sexual function and male pattern balding.

There is little reliable research on factors that wake up an indolent cancer, but it is speculated that factors for aggressive and non aggressive disease may differ.

So what have they found so far?

Sexual activity exercises the prostate, sweeps its ducts clean and may just have a protective effect.
Sexual activity exercises the prostate, sweeps its ducts clean and may just have a protective effect. BartekSzewczyk

Balding

The researchers found only those men who begin going bald by the age of 20 are at an increased risk of an indolent cancer becoming aggressive and of this happening at an earlier age.

This was not observed in men who developed male pattern balding at 40.

Although men can’t prevent early balding, the finding is useful because it suggests they should be more vigilant about prostate cancer as they get older.

Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, the project is based at Cancer Council of Victoria and ...
Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, the project is based at Cancer Council of Victoria and includes well-known urologist Professor Damien Bolton. Supplied

Published in the journal Cancer Causes & Control, the study suggests this small group of men should have closer follow-up with blood tests and urological investigations throughout their lives.

Forthcoming genetic studies will help to define further those at high risk of lethal cancer.

Professor Bolton, clinical professor of surgery at Melbourne University, says about 2 per cent of men start to develop frontal pattern baldness before 20.

Although early balding reflects a man’s hormonal milieu and his genetic background, it is also possible he may have been exposed to relatively high levels of testosterone in utero.

Sexual activity

Sexual activity remains a grey area.

The important factor here is not how many sexual partners a man has or whether they are male or female, but how often he ejaculates alone or in company.

The prostate is a secretory organ and its function is to provide a large part of seminal fluid, just as the function of the female breast is to provide milk. So it is thought it might matter how much a man makes this organ work.

How body shape changes may be a risk factor for advanced prostate cancer decades later.
How body shape changes may be a risk factor for advanced prostate cancer decades later. Michael Whitehead

Past research by the same group on all prostate cancers reported that the more men ejaculate, the greater the demand they place on the prostate and the lower their risk of cancer.

The biology is not understood, but one popular theory speculates that frequency flushes the gland clean of secretions or residues that might eventually cause disease.

In this study, however, the researchers were interested in the relationship between ejaculatory frequency from the ages 20 and 50, and the subsequent development of aggressive prostate cancer.

The study, published in the journal Urologic Oncology, found that ejaculating twice a week between the ages of 30 and 39 appeared to lower the chance of prostate cancer becoming aggressive.

Although the finding was statistically significant, the researchers say it may yet be spurious, and further studies need to be done.

Alcohol

One problem with studying the effects of alcohol is that people don’t reliably report their consumption. It’s known, however, that those with cancer often reveal more than healthy controls in case it is helpful. This is called an “information bias”.

Among the participants in this study, about 1300 men had aggressive prostate cancer. The rest, who constituted the control group, had been suspected of having prostate cancer but were found to be negative on biopsy.

There's a chance red and white wine may be protective against advanced prostate cancer.
There’s a chance red and white wine may be protective against advanced prostate cancer. supplied

That they had all been through similar anxiety and the full testing process was anticipated to reduce the information bias between the two groups.

Previous research found heavy alcohol consumption confers a modest increase in the risk of aggressive prostate cancer and suggested a high intake of beer raised the risk, while red wine modestly reduced it.

This new study, published in the journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases, added to the existing evidence that increasing the volume and frequency of beer increased risk, although it stressed other health risks associated with alcohol had not been assessed.

The study also suggested drinkers of all types of wine (red and white), regardless of quantity consumed, had a decreased risk of cancer compared with those who did not drink wine.

Abstainers appeared to be at increased risk compared with wine drinkers, but at decreased risk compared with beer and spirit drinkers.

The biological mechanism underlying these finding are unknown, although it has been suggested beer’s association with obesity and wine’s association with the natural compound resveratrol, found in the skin of red wine, may be factors.

Professor Giles is not too confident these findings on alcohol will stand the test of time.

Height, obesity, body shape

Once you have prostate cancer, smoking may prompt it to become aggressive.
Once you have prostate cancer, smoking may prompt it to become aggressive. Tamara Voninski

This study, which is yet to be published, looked at early life, at how men grew, when they had a growth spurt, their body shape and fat distribution.

The findings were complicated.

Professor Bolton says it shows men with a shorter pre-pubertal height – relative to friends at age 11 – were at increased risk of prostate cancer.

If this early shortness translated to obesity in mid-life, at the time of an initial biopsy, the men would be at a significantly higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

But if these men grew tall and didn’t become obese towards mid-life, they would overcome the risk of early shortness.

He said men who are slim and tall in their youth and become obese towards mid-life have an increased risk of aggressive cancer.

Other factors

Some of the findings, yet to be published, relate to smoking and medication.

While there has been some evidence that smoking is protective against developing prostate cancer, once a man has the cancer, the data appears to suggest that by continuing smoking, he increases his risk of it turning aggressive.

Previous studies have also suggested that medicines such as aspirin and anti-cholesterol drugs called statins reduce prostate cancer cells.

Obesity is known to be a risk factor for cancer. One way it is thought to do this is through creating chronic low-grade inflammation. This is the reason anti-inflammatories such as aspirin are thought to help reduce risk.

Statins are thought to help in other ways, but this new research has found both classes of drug have no impact either way.

Professor Giles said the theory that obesity encourages a dormant cancer to grow and become nasty remained speculative.

He remains hopeful that the fairly weak associations observed so far with lifestyle factors will become sharper when combined with the genetic data.

Other papers on factors including vitamins, sun exposure, shift work and exposure to toxins such N-nitroso compounds found in processed meat, are yet to be produced.

Dr Nathan Papa, a research Fellow at Melbourne University, crunched the data for the first four papers as part of his PhD thesis and is their lead author.

Professor Lawrentschuk says the studies are based on solid research and reiterate that genetics and lifestyle are important factors.

“I get asked the same question every day. Men want to know what they can do for their prostate health.”

He’s hoping that this study will ultimately provide some guidance on preventing progression and on when to seek counselling and/or treatment.

Jill Margo is The Australian Financial Review’s health editor and an associate adjunct professor at the University of NSW.

Read more: http://www.afr.com/lifestyle/health/mens-health/prostate-cancer-focus-shifts-from-finding-it-early-to-preventing-its-advance-20180205-h0u0tu#ixzz56ICMMwhL

Men with prostate cancer have access to fewer specialist nurses than patients with other cancers…despite it being a bigger killer than breast cancer

Men with prostate cancer have access to fewer specialist nurses than patients with other major cancers, statistics show.

For every urological nurse in the NHS there are 166 new prostate cancer cases a year – twice as many as the 86 cases for every breast cancer nurse, according to charity Macmillan Cancer Support.

Theresa May last night backed the Daily Mail’s campaign to end needless prostate deaths through earlier diagnosis and higher research spending. Last week, figures revealed prostate cancer has become a bigger killer than breast cancer for the first time.

More than 11,800 men are killed by the disease a year, while 11,400 women die of breast cancer – yet over the last 15 years prostate cancer research has received less than half as much funding.

Men with prostate cancer have access to fewer specialist nurses than patients with other major cancers, statistics show

Men with prostate cancer have access to fewer specialist nurses than patients with other major cancers, statistics show 

The PM’s spokesman said: ‘We absolutely welcome the Daily Mail’s campaign – it is a hugely important issue. The more we can raise awareness of this issue, and the need for men to get checked out if they have any concerns at all, the better.’

There are 307 NHS urological nurses in England, compared with 560 breast cancer nurses, Macmillan’s census of specialist cancer nurses found. The 2014 figures show only 72 urological nurses work solely on prostate cancer.

Others also deal with kidney, bladder and testicular cancer. Prostate cancer nurses have the most patients of 11 major cancer types, with 166 new cases per specialist, compared with 127 for lung cancer, 110 for sarcoma, 96 for bowel cancer and 86 for breast cancer. Heather Blake, of Prostate Cancer UK, said: ‘Prostate cancer is on track to become the most common cancer overall by 2030 with over 330,000 men currently living with the disease in the UK. We know that men with prostate cancer have better outcomes if they are assigned a specialist nurse.

I hadn’t even realised I was at risk

Thomas Kagezi (left) and Errol McKellar are survivors of prostate cancer

Thomas Kagezi (left) and Errol McKellar are survivors of prostate cancer

Fitness fanatic Thomas Kagezi had put his excessive need to use the toilet down to the fact that he drank a lot of water for his training.

But prostate cancer survivor Errol McKellar gave him a leaflet at a train station, and urged him to go for an examination. So the father-of-two decided to get tested.

The civil engineer, 57, said: ‘I had never thought about myself being a risk, but the fact was I was a black man in my fifties and at a high risk of getting the cancer. Plus I saw the urinating was actually a symptom.

‘I didn’t want to at first, but I thought I had better get tested.’

He was diagnosed in October 2016 and, after five weeks of radiotherapy, he was given the all-clear.

Mr McKellar, 60, gave a discount to customers at his garage in Hackney, East London, if they got tested – helping 48 men get diagnosed. He said men were too embarrassed, adding: ‘It’s mad and it needs to change.’

‘And the situation is set to get worse. With large numbers of the current workforce fast approaching retirement and far fewer nurses choosing urology as a specialism, the workforce simply isn’t being replenished at a time when we need it most.’

She said in some areas only half of men have access to a specialist nurse, who often act as the main point of contact for patients.

Karen Roberts, of Macmillan Cancer Support, said: ‘Prostate cancer patients often need really specific support dealing with the physical and emotional impact of the disease. While levels of need vary between cancer types, it is clear this is an area of specialist cancer care that is in desperate need of attention.’

Wendy Preston, of the Royal College of Nursing, said: ‘What is most worrying is that nurses generally only become specialists in fields like cancer once they’ve had many years of experience – but with one in three nurses set to retire in the next ten years, these shortages of specialists seem likely to get worse, not better.’ Cancer minister Steve Brine said the Government planned for every patient to have access to a cancer nurse specialist or support worker by 2021.

Men are more likely to get cancer than women because their immune system declines faster, research suggests. A study led by Dundee University, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, said men’s 14 per cent higher chance of cancer could be explained by poorer quality T-cells, which hunt down the disease.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-5355953/Men-prostate-cancer-access-fewer-nurses.html#ixzz56IBH4iMj

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